Collecting Lesson 2: Artistic Practice

Andy Warhol and Joseph Cornell's Collecting
05142012_EDU_138-of-Andy-Warhol's-610-Time-Capsules_main.jpg
Andy Warhol's 610 Time Capsules in the Archives of The Andy Warhol Museum. Photo by Richard Stoner 

Andy Warhol’s own elaborate practice of collecting is investigated in this lesson. Students are introduced to his Time Capsules and asked to think about their own cultural context in relation to articles found in Time Capsule 21. Joseph Cornell’s collage boxes are also introduced and analyzed.

Suggested Time Frame:

Warhol presentation: 20 minutes
TC21 Exploration: 40-80 minutes
Reflection and Review: 30 minutes
Cornell presentation: 20 minutes
Research: homework 
Discussion & Review: 40 minutes

Total time:  3-5 class periods over one week 

Objectives:

  • Students examine objects collected by Andy Warhol and Joseph Cornell from historical and cultural contexts
  • Students compare personal objects to artists’ object collections
  • Students write reflections on personal collecting habits and the creative process
  • Students research art movements in relation to Joseph Cornell
  • Students explain personal interpretations of an artwork 
 
Procedure
Andy Warhol, Time Capsule 13 (open), ©AWF
Andy Warhol, Time Capsule 13 (open), ©AWF

Materials & Handouts

Artists who collect: Andy Warhol Time Capsules Artists who collect: Joseph Cornell 
Computer Writing materials
Digital Projector 
Contents of Andy Warhol's Time-Capsule 44, photo by Richard Stoner, 1890-1973, ©AWF
Contents of Andy Warhol's Time-Capsule 44, photo by Richard Stoner, 1890-1973, ©AWF

Andy Warhol's Practice of Collecting

  1. Print student handout: Artists who collect: Andy Warhol Time Capsules and present Andy Warhol’s Practice of Collecting.
  2. Review the reproductions of Andy Warhol’s work
  3. Time Capsule Activity: Go to TC21 website and explore the objects inside.
  4. Choose three items from TC21. Explain what the three objects reveal about Andy Warhol.
  5. Find three similar items from your own life.
  6. Students should explain what the additional objects reveal about them.
  7. Have students write a reflection upon the following:
  8. - Identify and describe your own cultural context.

    - What is meaningful to you in school, at home and in your community?

    - In what ways do you most enjoy creating something? I.e. creating music compilations, writing, doodling, etc.

    - How could your ideas, culture and creative process work together in an art piece?

 
Joseph Cornell, Untitled (Cocatoo and Corks), c. 1948. 14 3/8 x 13 1/2 x 5 5/8 in., Private Collection, ©Joseph Cornell/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY
Joseph Cornell, Untitled (Cocatoo and Corks), c. 1948. 14 3/8 x 13 1/2 x 5 5/8 in., Private Collection, ©Joseph Cornell/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY

Joseph Cornell's Practice of Collecting

  1. Print student handout: Artists who collect: Joseph Cornell. Present Joseph Cornell’s practice.
  2. Hang up reproductions of Joseph Cornell’s work.
  3. Research: Surrealism, Assemblage, Collage.
  4. Use the Comprehension Questions either in class discussion or as a written assignment.
  5. Discuss Cornell’s artistic practice:
  6. - What did Cornell collect?

    - How did he use collecting in his artwork?

    - What inspired Cornell?

    - Explain the connection between Surrealist and Dada art and Cornell's boxes. How are they similar? How are they different?

    - Interpret one of Cornell’s pieces.

 
Assessment

Warhol Education Rubrics

Click the Warhol Rubric headers below to reveal associated rubrics to which this lesson applies.

Critical Thinking
Communication
Historical Context
Media and Related Items
Collection