Collecting Youth Culture

Youth Philosophies and Perspectives from Around the Globe
08312012_EDU_timecapsules_main.jpg
Time capsules exchanged between the Creative and Performing Arts School in Pittsburgh, Pa and the School of the Arts in Singapore in 2012

Using The Philosophy of Andy Warhol: From A to B and Back Again as a starting point, this project aims to gather youth philosophies from around the globe and gives today’s youth a forum for dialogue to address issues that youth face on a daily basis or even to lend an understanding to issues new and unique from one’s own experience.

What do these ideas mean to teens today? What do youth think about such universal ideas as they look introspectively and retrospectively to the world around them?

Grades:

6-12 

Subjects:

Art, Philosophy, Psychology, Cultural Studies 

Suggested Time Frame:

4-6 class periods 

Objectives:

  • Students will read the chapters: love, beauty, art, time, fame and work from the book The Philosophy of Andy Warhol: From A to B and Back Again  
  • Students will compare their own interpretations and perceptions on the themes of love, beauty, art, time, fame and work to Andy Warhol's
  • Students will collect and compile youth philosophies on these themes in the form of a video or ‘zine 
  • Students will use Warhol’s Time Capsules and process of collecting as a catalyst to create their own collaborative time capsule
  • Students will explore social media as a way to gather, collect and engage in social dialogue about youth culture around the world
 
Book Cover: The Philosophy of Andy Warhol: From A to B and Back Again 
Book Cover: The Philosophy of Andy Warhol: From A to B and Back Again 

About the Book:

Andy Warhol’s role as author was nearly always collaborative. He recorded many hours of his life on audiotape. The Philosophy of Andy Warhol: From A to B and Back Again is based on tape recordings of Andy Warhol, Brigid Berlin, Fred Hughes, Pat Hackett and Bob Colacello. Andy Warhol’s observations on love, food, beauty, fame, work, money and success are written in a mixed style of humor and thoughtfulness. Pat Hackett, the coauthor of this book, worked closely with Warhol for 20 years on a number of projects ranging from a screenplay to Popism: The Warhol ’60s.

Procedure
'Zines created by CAPA students in Pittsburgh, Pa and SOTA students in Singapore for the Collecting Youth Culture Project
'Zines created by CAPA students in Pittsburgh, Pa and SOTA students in Singapore for the Collecting Youth Culture Project

Collecting Youth Philosophy: 'Zines and Video


Materials:

 The Philosophy of Andy Warhol  Pencils, Markers, PaperCollecting Youth Philosophy student video 
Xerox copierCell Phones, Video CamerasStudent 'Zine Examples 
Computers 'Zine-Making Video 'Zines Website/Template 
 

Procedure:

  1. Introduce the following ideas to the students: love, beauty, art, time, fame and work. Ask students to free write about their understanding of each theme; allow 20 minutes for this free write. What does the word mean to them? It is important to make the distinction that we are looking for personal meaning, not dictionary definitions.
  2. Discuss student meanings and capture responses (discussion could be videotaped for use at a later time). Emphasize how each student interprets or perceives the themes differently. Discuss how our interpretations and perceptions shape our philosophy towards an idea (the Collecting Youth Philosophy Video from CAPA students could be shown at this time).
  3. Provide students with the chapters of love, beauty, art, work, time and fame from Andy Warhol: From A to B and Back Again and ask them to choose one theme to focus on. The book may be accessed here
  4. After students finish the chapter, ask them to compare the ideas presented in the text with their own ideas. Ask students:
  5. - What were Andy Warhol’s ideas on the theme?

    - What were your own ideas on the theme?

    - How are the similar? How are they different?

    - Does the definition change depending on the context in which it happens?

  6. Speed Discussion: break students into groups according to the theme they chose. Have them pair off and discuss their ideas with their partner for one minute. Continue Speed Discussion until students have spoken to all members in their group.
  7. Next, regroup and talk about the Speed Discussions as a class. Capture responses on large newsprint paper. Ask students:
  8. - What did you agree/disagree on when defining your theme?

    - Did any of your thoughts or opinions on the theme change? How?

    - Were you able to define collectively your theme? Why or why not?

  9. Ask students to begin to collect youth perspectives on their theme via phones and cameras with video capabilities. Students should:
  10. - Ask their friends questions and get a feel for what they think about their theme.

    - Record the questions and responses and upload and edit images and video to a computer. Students could also gather songs and artwork that represents their theme.

  11. Photocopy ‘Zine templates from this website, or make your own. Watch this YouTube Video on ‘Zine-making to help get you started.
  12. Encourage students to distribute and gather youth perspectives from their friends by making a ‘zine that reflects their philosophies on love, beauty, fame, work, time and art.
 

 

Contents of Singaporean Youth's Timecapsule 2012
Contents of Singaporean Youth's Timecapsule 2012

Collecting Youth Culture: Time Capsules


Materials:

cardboard box Student VideosCD's
Time Capsule 21 website Students 'ZinesPhotos
Time Capsule 21 handout Objects collected by studentsStudent Artwork

 

Procedure:

  1. Present Andy Warhol’s Time Capsules on the Time Capsule 21 website and discuss Warhol’s process of collecting.
  2. Print out the Time Capsule 21 handout for students and have them complete the activity.
  3. Discuss with students how they can use Warhol’s Time Capsules as a catalyst to explore their own youth culture and what it means to be a teenager in our global society.
  4. As a one-day activity, you might want to do The Pocket Project lesson with your students to introduce the idea of collecting.
  5. Provide a plain cardboard box and ask students to “collect their youth culture” by bringing in various objects representing the themes of love, beauty, fame, work, time and art. Items can include student artwork, mixed CDs, handmade ‘zines and videos, etc.
  6. How does this object reflect my theme?
  7. - What does this object say about me or my culture?

    - How will students from other cultures interpret this object?

    - How does this object reflect my youth culture today?

  8. Find another school locally, nationally or internationally to exchange time capsules with.
  9. Ask students to join the Collecting Youth Culture Facebook page to upload their video and photos from this activity to share with students from other cultures.
 
Assessment

Warhol Education Rubrics

Click the Warhol Rubric headers below to reveal associated rubrics to which this lesson applies.

Critical Thinking
Aesthetics
Communication
Creative Process
Historical Context
Media and Related Items
Video
Collecting Youth Philosophy Video from CAPA students
Collecting Youth Culture Video: "Pitt Kids" by CAPA students
Student Showcase
Collecting Youth Culture: SingaporeCollecting Youth Culture: Hong KongCollecting Youth Culture: Shanghai