Critical Response Lesson 3: Intuitive Response

Intuitive Response
07102012_EDU_Warhol-Liz_main.jpg
Andy Warhol, Silver Liz [Ferus Type], 1963, ©AWF

Students are encouraged to use their intuitive skills in this lesson. Guided by a series of prompts and after looking at artwork by Warhol and de Kooning, they write a variety of responses based on impression and emotion. They then share their writing with the class.

Suggested Time Frame: 

Introduction: 10 minutes
Student writing time: 20-40 minutes
Discussion: 30 minutes

Total time frame: 1-2 class periods 

Objectives: 

  • Students will respond intuitively to two artworks
  • Students will describe and discuss personalities of subjects depicted in artworks
  • Students will create hypothetical and fictional contexts for two works of art
  • Students will articulate opinions about artworks
 
Procedure
Detail of Intuitive Response Handout in this lesson
Detail of Intuitive Response Handout in this lesson

Materials:

The Intuitive Prompts Handouts are included in the Lesson PDF 
Visual Images, printed out or digitally displayed
Pencils

 

When a person views an artwork for the first time he or she creates a first response that is intuitive, personal and often purely emotional. This response is based on personal experience, feelings, associations and creative imagination. This intuitive response shapes much of what we value—our likes and dislikes. It is an important part of enjoying artwork and key to formulating our critical and aesthetic responses.

The following steps and questions help students make free associations with the paintings and express their own ideas about the works in a fun context.

  1. Print out and hang or project digital images on a wall of Andy Warhol’s Liz and de Kooning’s Woman VI.
  2. Use the Intuitive Prompts Handout to generate intuitive responses to the artworks. This handout may be shortened for time constraints. Pick two or three prompts instead of all five.
  3. Ask students to share their writing with the class.
  4. Collect these responses from your students when they are finished and hand them out again later in the unit as they write their formal criticism in Lesson 5.
 
Assessment

Warhol Education Rubrics

Click the Warhol Rubric headers below to reveal associated rubrics to which this lesson applies.

Critical Thinking
Aesthetics
Communication