Critical Response Lesson 5: Writing a Criticism

Synthesizing Ideas
07102012_EDU_Liz-Woman-2_main
Installation shot of Andy Warhol's Liz and de Kooning's Woman VI at The Andy Warhol Museum, Americanisms Exhibition, 2002

Students review the writing that they have completed for Critical Response Lessons two, three and four and combine ideas in order to establish and articulate their own informed critical point of view relating to a piece of art.

Suggested Time Frame:

Assignment Introduction: 10 minutes
Student Writing Time: Homework or 1 hour in class
Discussion: 30 minutes

Total time frame: 1-2 class periods 

Objectives: 

  • Students will combine ideas and responses regarding works of art
  • Students will construct a personal point of view on a work of art
  • Students will explain personal points of view through a written critique
 
Procedure
(top) Andy Warhol, Liz, 1965, ©AWF; (bottom) Willem de Kooning, Woman VI, 1953, Gift of G. David Thompson, The Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh
(top) Andy Warhol, Liz, 1965, ©AWF; (bottom) Willem de Kooning, Woman VI, 1953, Gift of G. David Thompson, The Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh

Writing a Critique

  1. Look at the paintings again and list adjectives that come to mind.
  2. Review your Intuitive Responses from Lesson 2. Combine the adjectives from both lists.
  3. Combine ideas from Intuitive Responses and from your Research and Analysis in Lesson 4 to write a critique or “point of view” about the paintings, Warhol’s Liz and de Kooning’s Woman VI. Address the following:
  4. - What is your critical judgment (positive or negative) about the work? Support your judgment with informed reasoning.

    - How do you think each artist portrayed women?

    - How do the formal elements of each painting and the artist’s technique support the meaning or your understanding of the work?

    - In what ways did each artist reflect the values of his time?

    - In what ways are these paintings and the ideas they communicate relevant or irrelevant to viewers today?

 
Assessment

Wrap-up:

Review the students’ writing samples in class and discuss the strengths and weakness of their arguments.

Warhol Education Rubrics

Click the Warhol Rubric headers below to reveal associated rubrics to which this lesson applies.

Critical Thinking
Aesthetics
Communication
Historical Context