Sound Series: Jace Clayton – The Julius Eastman Memorial Dinner

when

Saturday, March 14, 2015 - 8pm

Add to Calendar
where
Google Map
Click the map for directions
tickets
General $20
Student $15
Members$15
Buy Tickets

The Warhol welcomes back Jace Clayton, a.k.a. DJ /rupture, who leads an ensemble work conceived for twin pianos, live electronics, and voice, that brings fresh insight to the artistic legacy of Julius Eastman – the mercurial gay African American composer who mixed canny minimalist innovation with head-on political provocation. The Julius Eastman Memorial Dinner comprises new arrangements and interpretations of a selection of Eastman’s piano compositions. As Clayton uses his own custom-designed 'Sufi Plug Ins' software to live-process the pianos of David Friend and Emily Manzo, he also intersperses musical vignettes – performed by neo-Sufi vocalist Arooj Aftab – to lend context and nuance to the composer's saga, which was cut short in 1990 at age 49. 

The Julius Eastman Memorial Dinner has been performed at Bang on a Can Marathon, MoMA PS1, 

Liquid Music at St. Paul Chamber Orchestra, Cincinnati Art Center, University of Texas Austin, REDCAT, and several other venues. 

“This is a difficult, self-annihilating temperament to pay proper tribute to. On The Julius Eastman Memory Depot, Jace Clayton—better and more-often known as DJ/rupture —goes about it exactly the right way. . .The result honors the intentions behind Eastman's trickster spirit to the point that Clayton and Eastman seem very much to be making this music together in real time”  

 – Jayson Greene, Pitchfork 

"A captivating project that constitutes a powerful homage by one bold figure to another." 

 – Ron Schepper, Textura 

Co-presented with the Carnegie Museum of Art and the Music on the Edge series of the University of Pittsburgh Department of Music 

Additional Information

Parking: The entrance to the Carnegie Museum parking lot is at the corner of Forbes Ave. and Craig St. Parking may also be available on nearby streets or in the park. 

search calendar
Error loading XSLT document. E:\Domain\warholprod\responsive\xslt\maincontent.xslt NOTE: the SERVER is accessing this URL.
Stylesheet must start either with an 'xsl:stylesheet' or an 'xsl:transform' element, or with a literal result element that has an 'xsl:version' attribute, where prefix 'xsl' denotes the 'http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform' namespace. Line 1, position 1.

The Warhol welcomes back Jace Clayton, a.k.a. DJ /rupture, who leads an ensemble work conceived for twin pianos, live electronics, and voice, that brings fresh insight to the artistic legacy of Julius Eastman – the mercurial gay African American composer who mixed canny minimalist innovation with head-on political provocation. The Julius Eastman Memorial Dinner comprises new arrangements and interpretations of a selection of Eastman’s piano compositions. As Clayton uses his own custom-designed 'Sufi Plug Ins' software to live-process the pianos of David Friend and Emily Manzo, he also intersperses musical vignettes – performed by neo-Sufi vocalist Arooj Aftab – to lend context and nuance to the composer's saga, which was cut short in 1990 at age 49. 

The Julius Eastman Memorial Dinner has been performed at Bang on a Can Marathon, MoMA PS1, 

Liquid Music at St. Paul Chamber Orchestra, Cincinnati Art Center, University of Texas Austin, REDCAT, and several other venues. 

“This is a difficult, self-annihilating temperament to pay proper tribute to. On The Julius Eastman Memory Depot, Jace Clayton—better and more-often known as DJ/rupture —goes about it exactly the right way. . .The result honors the intentions behind Eastman's trickster spirit to the point that Clayton and Eastman seem very much to be making this music together in real time”  

 – Jayson Greene, Pitchfork 

"A captivating project that constitutes a powerful homage by one bold figure to another." 

 – Ron Schepper, Textura 

Error loading XSLT document. E:\Domain\warholprod\responsive\xslt\CalendarEvents.xslt NOTE: the SERVER is accessing this URL.
Stylesheet must start either with an 'xsl:stylesheet' or an 'xsl:transform' element, or with a literal result element that has an 'xsl:version' attribute, where prefix 'xsl' denotes the 'http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform' namespace. Line 1, position 1.