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Past Project Exposures: Adam Milner: Remains

November 2, 2016–January 15, 2017

In this installation shot of Adam Milner's art, a hand holds various small objects representing body parts, including doll eyes, a small bone, and a plaster imprint of a finger.

The Warhol presents the seventh iteration of the Exposures series: Remains by Adam Milner. Remains, a new work made expressly for The Warhol, presents an installation of fragmented bodies made up of casts, mementos, and detritus from our everyday lives. Working within a social and performance practice, Milner creates collections and archives that blur boundaries between private and public, the intimate and detached. This Exposures project is incorporated in the museum galleries, and Milner excavates both his personal life as well as the museum archives collection to assemble site-specific works that reveal a deep desire to understand where a body begins and ends, who has control of it, and how we can better empathize with non-human bodies. Comprised of numerous small objects—a wisdom tooth from an ex-boyfriend cast in silver, objects from Andy Warhol’s personal archive and life, fingernails from a stranger—the artifacts add up to bodies, in the way an archaeologist might reconstruct a figure with excavated bones and fossils. Milner’s work, while deeply personal, ultimately deals with broader notions of exchange and desire. His installation is exhibited on the 3rd floor near the museum archives collection and Time Capsules.

Adam Milner creates archives, performances, and drawings, which reveal a personal vulnerability while examining broader politics of relationships and intimacy. He has exhibited at the Aspen Art Museum, the Museum of Contemporary Art Denver, Casa Maauad (Mexico City), and David B. Smith Gallery (Denver). He currently lives and works in Pittsburgh as an MFA candidate at Carnegie Mellon University.

Exposures is curated by Jessica Beck, associate curator of art.