Skip to content

Museum

Mission

The Andy Warhol Museum is the global keeper of Andy Warhol’s legacy.

Located in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, the place of Andy Warhol’s birth, The Andy Warhol Museum holds the largest collection of Warhol’s artworks and archival materials. We are one of the most comprehensive single-artist museums in the world and the largest in North America.

Founding

The Warhol is one of the four Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh, and a collaborative project between Carnegie Institute, Dia Art Foundation, and The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. Plans to house The Warhol in Pittsburgh were announced in 1989, and the museum opened its doors during a 24-hour celebration on May 13, 1994. Originally built in 1911 as a distribution center for products sold to mills and mines, The Warhol was redesigned by architect Richard Gluckman and features seven floors of gallery and exhibition space as well as an underground level that houses The Factory education studio and the conservation lab.

A photograph from outside the Warhol museum looking into the lobby.

Photo by Abby Warhola

Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh

Established in 1895 by Andrew Carnegie, Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh is a collection of four distinct museums: Carnegie Museum of Art, Carnegie Museum of Natural History, Carnegie Science Center, and The Andy Warhol Museum. The museums reach more than 1.4 million people a year through exhibitions, educational programs, outreach activities, and special events.

Collection

The Warhol holds the largest collection of Warhol’s artworks and archival materials. Paintings, drawings, commercial illustrations, sculptures, prints, photographs, wallpapers, sketchbooks, and books cover the entire range of Warhol’s career, from his early student work to pop art paintings and collaborations. The Warhol’s film and video collection includes approximately 350 preserved Warhol films, and it houses the entire output of the artist’s work in video, comprised of more than 4,000 videotapes. The archives is the greatest single collection of ephemera documenting Warhol’s life, and it includes Warhol’s serial work the Time Capsules—610 containers that the artist filled, sealed, and sent to storage.